British diver reveals DANGER for the last TWO during rescue

One of the British divers who took part in the rescue of 12 boys and their football coach from the Tham Luang cave astonishing details about the mission.

Speaking to ABC 20/20, diver Jason Mallinson described how the rescuers were forced to resort to their “last option” as they “didn’t have anymore time to free the boys”.

Mr Mallinson also revealed how the they feared that one of the youngsters might die because his mask would not fit due him being so small.

“It didn’t fit him,” he said.

“We put it on him, really strapped down tight so his nose was flattened against his face and there was a big gap under his chin. We just couldn’t get it to seal.”

Mr Mallsion said he was forced to hold the mask tightly against the boy’s face as he swam with him to the exit, otherwise the boy may have drowned.

“You weren’t going back to where they started… It was a case of getting him out. A bit brutal but dead or alive”.

He also revealed how the boys had been given ketamine to help keep them calm during the evacuation procedure.

Chris Jewell, who rescued the second to last boy, also told the programme how he ran into difficulty during the rescue.

Dr Jewell explained how he lost grip of the three inch thick rope that was used to help guide the rescuers out of the cave and that he could not regain grip of it, instead grabbing hold of an electrical cable and using that for guidance.

However, this only resulted in him going further into the cave, before he was forced to resurface and place the boy on a ledge after being completely disoriented in the pitch black of the cave water.

Luckily for Dr Jewell, Mr Mallinson and Australian Dr Richard Harris who was involved in anesthetizing the boys managed to catch up to him and lead him to safety.

Mr Mallinson also revealed how it was his spur of the moment idea to ask the trapped footballers to write letters to their parents on his waterproof notepad.

“They never knew they were going to get out of there,it could have been the last message they ever gave to their parents.

“I think they wanted to put their parents’ minds at rest.”

“It was quite emotional for me to be able pass those messages back,” he added. – abc news

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